Associate Professor Jonathon Allen

Associate Professor of Design
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Dr Jonathon Allen is an Associate Professor of Design within the School of Humanities and Communication Arts and the Interim Head of The Academy, the award winning interdisciplinary program, at Western Sydney University.  Dr Allen is an Industrial Designer by training, and has headed both Industrial Design and Visual Communication Design programs at WSU.  He has held academic positions at Monash University, Massey University, NZ, and Loughborough University, UK, and has supervised many international award-winning students.  His current research interests are in material intelligence (smart materials, intelligent use of materials, and in the hidden stories of sourcing and selecting materials); the application of design thinking to address pressing concerns related to food security, climate change, and health; and in the use of Augmented Reality to interact and engage with the physical world. For more, see www.designacademic.com.

Associate Professor Katherine Bode

Associate Professor, Literary and Textual Studies
ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences
Australian National University

Katherine Bode is Associate Professor of literary and textual studies at the Australian National University. Her research focuses on literary and book history using digital and quantitative methods. She is author of Reading by Numbers: Recalibrating the Literary Field (2012) and co-editor of Resourceful Reading: The New Empiricism, eResearch and Australian Literary Culture (2009). Her latest book is currently in press and is entitled A World of Fiction: Mass-digitization, Nineteenth-century Australian Newspapers, and the Future of Literary History. Katherine’s research focuses on the critical potential – and limitations – of digital methods for literary and book history, a topic that leads her to consider such things as the nature of archives, the rhetorical power of numbers, and the future of the humanities.

Dr Helen Bones (Co-Convenor)

Research Officer in Digital Humanities
Digital Humanities Research Group
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Helen Bones is a Research Associate with the Digital Humanities Research Group at Western Sydney University, working on an Australian National Data Service-funded project to curate a digital repository of the State Library of New South Wales’s Angus & Robertson archive collection. Helen’s doctoral thesis, completed at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, employed empirical methods to question the dominance of cultural nationalist thinking in New Zealand literary history. She is currently researching trans-Tasman literary connections and writers who fall in-between national categorisations. Recent publications include ““A book is a book, all the world over”: New Zealand and the Colonial Writing World 1890-1945” in the Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History (2015).

Professor Simon Burrows

Professor in Digital Humanities, Professor in History
Digital Humanities Research Group
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Simon Burrows is Professor of Digital Humanities and Professor in History at Western Sydney University. He was instigator and principal investigator of the ‘French Book Trade in Enlightenment Europe’ (FBTEE) database project, which has won wide acclaim, and founding Director of the Centre for the Comparative History of Print at the University of Leeds. The author or editor of six books and over 30 major chapters and articles, he is currently finishing a monograph entitled Enlightenment Best-Sellers and is with Glenn Roe currently editing Digitizing Enlightenment. Simon Burrows is an investigator on the ‘Mapping Print, Charting Enlightenment’ and ARCHivER projects.

Professor David Carter

Professor of Australian Literature and Cultural History
School of Communication and Arts
University of Queensland

David Carter is Professor of Australian Literature and Cultural History at the University of Queensland and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. He is the author of A Career in Writing: Judah Waten and Cultural Politics of a Literary Career (1997), Dispossession, Dreams and Diversity: Issues in Australian Studies (2006), and Always Almost Modern: Australian Print Cultures and Modernity (2013). With Roger Osborne, he has recently completed a large-scale study of Australian books published in the United States (forthcoming Sydney University Press). He is editor of a dozen books including Making Books: Contemporary Australian Publishing (2007), and is a contributor to The Routledge Handbook of the Sociology of Art and Culture, The Cambridge History of Australia, The Cambridge History of Australian Literature, and The Cambridge Companion to Australian Literature. He has published widely on Australian publishing, modernity, periodicals and middlebrow book culture.

Baden Chant

Senior Designer
Visual Communications, Office of Marketing
Western Sydney University

Baden Chant is responsible for the University’s brand and outward facing digital and print communications. A designer for over 20 years, his personal work has been featured in Desktop Magazine, the Sydney Morning Herald, and the Dominion Post among others. Baden kindly lent his talents to the SHARP conference and designed our distinctively Sydney-themed and yet bookish logo.

Professor Hart Cohen

Professor in Media Arts
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Dr Hart Cohen is Professor in Media Arts in the School of Humanities and Communication Arts and a member of the Institute for Culture and Society and the Digital Humanities Research Group at Western Sydney University, Australia. He is the co-author of Screen Media Arts, winner of best Textbook – Australian Publishers Association, 2009 and is editor of the Global Media Journal, Australian Edition: 2007–present. A sole-authored book, titled, The Strehlow Archive: Explorations in new and old media is to be released November, 2017 as part of Routledge’s Digital Humanities series.

Dr Jason Ensor (Chair and Convenor)

Manager, Library Digital Infrastructure
University Library
Western Sydney University

Jason Ensor is manager of systems for the library at Western Sydney University where he oversees all internal and external hosted technology services provided to the library which support the delivery of library resources and applications to students and staff. This includes all software, infrastructure and vendors that underpin library business, network, server and storage environments. With a PhD in a digital humanities field, he regularly publishes in Australian Book History and on matters related to research impact and rethinking scholarship in the digital age. In 2017-2018, Dr Ensor is Visiting Professor at the Electronic Textual Cultures Laboratory, University of Victoria, in Canada. He also oversees the technical development and database construction for the MEDIATE project, Radboud University, in The Netherlands. In 2015 he was Conference Director for ‘Global Digital Humanities’.

Dr Rachel Hendery

Senior Lecturer in Digital Humanities
Digital Humanities Research Group
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Rachel Hendery is a linguist by background who specialises in historical linguistics, the effects of language contact, new varieties of English, mixed languages, and variation in the world’s languages. Rachel’s linguistic research has been mainly concentrated on the Pacific and Australia. Rachel has worked on large collaborative anthropological / historical / linguistics projects such as the Australian Kinship project (AustKin), mapping variation in kinship terms in Aboriginal Australia. Beyond linguistics, Rachel is interested in new computational and digital methods for data visualisation, digitisation and dissemination of archival materials, and mapping and modelling of humanities data.

Dr Anne Jamison

Lecturer in English Literature
Writing and Society Research Centre
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Anne Jamison’s research focus is on nineteenth-century Irish and Australian women’s writing and she has published numerous journal articles in this field. She is also author of a recent academic monograph; E. Œ. Somerville and Martin Ross: Female Authorship and Literary Collaboration (Cork University Press, 2016). Anne is further interested in the impact of digital technologies on feminist historiography and is part of a major international project to digitise The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing in collaboration with JSTOR (USA) and Queen’s University Belfast (UK). She was awarded the Nancy Keesing Fellowship for 2016 by the State Library of New South Wales to develop her current research into education and children’s literature in nineteenth-century Ireland and Australia. This fellowship also involved the development of an online exhibition of key archival collections held at the State Library, National Museums Northern Ireland (UK) and Queen’s University Belfast (UK).

Kerry Kilner

Director, AustLit & UQ Research Fellow
School of Communication and Arts
University of Queensland

Kerry Kilner is the Director and General Editor of AustLit and a UQ Research Fellow. Apart from running the behemoth that is AustLit — the premiere research environment and information resource for the history of Australian literary and publishing history — she researches in the fields of digital humanities and Australian theatre history. Kerry has a long history in bibliographical research and was project manager and co-associate editor of the four volume print Bibliography of Australian Literature (published between 2001-2008). She worked at Monash University from 1993 until 1998 when she moved to the University of Queensland to steer the bibliography project into a web-based collaboration between multiple universities.

Associate Professor Sara Knox

Lecturer in Cultural Studies and English
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Associate Professor Sara Knox presently teaches Cultural Studies and English in the School of Humanities and Communication Arts at Western Sydney University. Her research focusses on the cultural history of death, and the representation of violence. She is author of Murder: a Tale of Modern American Life (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1998) and a member of the International Editorial Advisory Board of Mortality. Her novel The Orphan Gunner (Artarmon, N.S.W: Giramondo, 2007) was short-listed for the regional Commonwealth Writer’s Prize for first book, and for the Age Book of the Year. Her most current research examines Reddit users sharing of accounts of encounters with revenant pets to shed light on processes of sharing that turn private experience into an articulation of communal understanding of the afterlife and a lived, everyday experience of the domestic.

Dr Julieanne Lamond

Editor, Australian Literary Studies
Convener, 2018 Literary Studies Convention
Lecturer in English
College of Arts and Social Sciences
Australian National University

Dr Julieanne Lamond is editor of Australian Literary Studies and lectures in English at Australian National University. Her research focuses on literary culture at the turn of the twentieth century, especially that written and read in Australia, gender and contemporary literary culture, and the intersection between scholarly and popular cultures of reading.

Professor Martyn Lyons

Emeritus Professor of history and European Studies
School of Humanities & Languages

University of New South Wales

Martyn Lyons is Emeritus Professor in the School of Humanities and Languages at UNSW. His research interests lie in the history of reading and writing practices in Europe and Australia, and his most recent book was The Writing Culture of Ordinary People in Europe, c. 1860-1920 (Cambridge University Press, 2013). Martyn has contributed to national book histories including L’Histoire de l’Edition française, and with John Arnold, he edited and contributed several chapters to A History of the Book in Australia, 1891-1945: A National Culture in a Colonised Market (University of Queensland Press, 2001). Martyn is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and a member of SHARP’s Executive Council.

Dr Peter Mauch

Senior Lecturer in Modern History
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Peter Mauch is a senior lecturer in modern history at Western Sydney University. A military/diplomatic historian with a particular interest in the origins, course, and aftermath of Japan’s involvement in World War II, he has written Sailor Diplomat: Nomura Kichisaburo and the Japanese-American War (Harvard University Asia Center, 2011). He is currently writing a book-length study of General Tojo Hideki, which is contracted for publication with Harvard University Press.

Dr Katherine McDonough

Research Associate in Digital Humanities
Digital Humanities Research Group
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Katherine McDonough is a Research Associate with the ‘Mapping Print, Charting Enlightenment’ at Western Sydney University supporting the development of the ‘French Book Trade in Enlightenment Europe’ DH project. She is a historian of eighteenth-century France interested in the spatial history of politics, information technologies, and infrastructure development. Drawing on her dissertation work at Stanford University, her book manuscript Public Works Laboratory: Building a Province in Eighteenth-Century France explores the politics of building highways with corvée labor in Brittany. Her research has been supported by the NSF, the Smithsonian Libraries, and the John Carter Brown Library. She is currently developing resources for scholars of the early modern world to use linked historical geodata in digital humanities projects.

Dr Matt McGuire

Senior Lecturer in English Literature
Deputy Director, Writing and Society Research Centre, Western Sydney University

Vice President Australian University Heads of English

Matthew McGuire is a Senior Lecturer in English Literature. He has published widely on various aspects of Irish and Scottish literature. His key publications include the academic monograph, Contemporary Scottish Literature (2008). He is the editor of The Edinburgh Companion to Contemporary Scottish Poetry (2009), The Everyman Book of Irish Poems (2011), and The Collected Poems of Iain Crichton Smith (2011). His work has appeared in various peer-reviewed journals including the Edinburgh ReviewScottish Studies Review, Clues and New Hibernia Review. His current research explores the role of literature in the aftermath of political conflict, with a focus on Northern Ireland in the wake of the Troubles. Matt McGuire is also the author of two novels, Dark Dawn (2012) and When Sorrows Come (2014). He has appeared at the Glasgow ‘Aye Write’ Book Festival, the Edinburgh International Book Festival been featured as a guest author on the BBC and on ABC Radio National.

Associate Professor Simone Murray

Associate Professor (Reader) in Literary Studies
Faculty of Arts
Monash University

Simone Murray is an Associate Professor (Reader) in literary studies at Monash University in Melbourne where her research centres upon sociologies of literature. She is a long-time SHARPist, having attended SHARP annual conferences and regional ‘focus’ conferences over some 20 years.  Her book Mixed Media: Feminist Presses and Publishing Politics (Pluto Press UK) was awarded the 2005 SHARP DeLong Book Prize. Her second monograph, The Adaptation Industry: The Cultural Economy of Contemporary Literary Adaptation (2011), was published by Routledge, US, and has been widely reviewed in English-, French-, German- and Swedish-language publications. Her current research into how the Internet is changing literary culture will culminate in the monographThe Digital Literary Sphere: Reading, Writing and Selling Books in the Internet Era, due to go to press with Johns Hopkins UP in mid 2017.

Richard Neville

Mitchell Librarian
Director of Education & Scholarship
State Library of New South Wales

Richard Neville is the Mitchell Librarian and Director of Education & Scholarship at the State Library of NSW. With a research background and acknowledged expertise in nineteenth Australian art and culture, he has published widely on colonial art and society, and curated numerous exhibitions focusing on these areas. He has also been extensively involved in the acquisition, arrangement, description and promotion of the Library’s renowned Australian research collections.

Maggie Patton

Manager
Research & Discovery

State Library of New South Wales

Maggie Patton is the Manager, Research & Discovery at the State Library of New South Wales.  She is responsible for leading the Library’s curatorial team.  Maggie provides expert advice on activities that develop, interpret, and promote discovery and engagement with the significant and unique State Library collections.  Maggie has particular interest and expertise in historical mapping and rare printed material and is working on a range of projects using emerging technologies to connect researchers with both contemporary and heritage collections.

Dr Laure Philip

Research Associate in Digital Humanities
Digital Humanities Research Group
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Laure Philip did her Masters and PhD at the University of Warwick in the UK. Her background is in Eighteenth-Century Studies, with a particular focus on the French Revolution and the British-French relationships during the 1790s. Dr. Philip works with us on the strand of the project entitled ‘The Illegal Book Trade Revisited.’ She is currently interpreting banned book lists in order to discern the prevalence of Enlightenment philosophie in comparison with other illegal genres, such as erotica and counterfeit editions.

Dr Xiang Ren

Research Fellow
Australia-China Institute for Arts and Culture
Western Sydney University

Xiang Ren is a research fellow in the Australia-China Institute for Arts and Culture and a member of the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University. His research looks at the evolving role of publishing in China’s social and cultural transitions and the impact of disruptive innovation in global creative economy. He has published widely on relevant topics and led and participated in many projects in digital publishing and open access in Australia and China. His forthcoming co-authored book, titled ‘Open Knowledge and Digital China’, will be published by Edward Elgar. Prior to his academic career, he spent over a decade working in the Chinese publishing industry as a senior editor and sales director. He is also a published fiction author in Chinese.

Dr Ruth Sheridan

Independent Scholar

Dr Ruth Sheridan is currently an independent scholar publishing at the interface of contemporary critical theory and ancient religious texts. She has recently completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Charles Sturt University, where she published two monographs on the rhetorics of prejudice in ancient Christian literature, as well as numerous articles on the politics of translating ancient languages, the application of psychoanalytic theory to ancient narratives, and the reception of anti-Semitic tropes in culture and film. Her first monograph, Retelling Scripture (Brill, 2012) won a prestigious international award from Heidelberg University (Templeton Foundation) for best first book in religious studies. Ruth is currently expanding her research interests to cover the politics of digitising ancient religious manuscripts and the ways in which the changing material formats of ancient religious literature affects ideological conceptualisations of canonical boundaries.

Professor Anthony Uhlmann

Director
Writing and Society Research Centre
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

Anthony Uhlmann is the Director the Writing and Society Research Centre at Western Sydney University. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and has published three academic books: two on Irish novelist and playwright Samuel Beckett with Cambridge University Press and one on Modernist novelists James Joyce, Virginia Woolf and Vladimir Nabokov with Bloomsbury Academic. He is a former editor of the Journal of Beckett Studies. He is currently finishing a new book on the contemporary South African / Australian novelist J. M. Coetzee. He is also working on two ARC Discovery Grants: Other Worlds: Forms of World Literature, and Spinoza and Literature. His first novel, Saint Antony in his Desert, will be published by the University of Western Australia Press late 2017.

Dr David Walton

Senior Lecturer in International Relations
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University

David Walton is a Senior Lecturer in international relations at Western Sydney University. His most recent publications are ‘Australian foreign policy conundrums’ in Chinese Blue Book on Australia (Social Sciences Academy Press; Beijing, 2017) and David Walton and Emilian Kavalski (eds.) Power Transition in Asia (Routledge; London, 2016). David has been a short-term visiting professor at Tokyo University, Meiji University, University of Seoul and Beijing Foreign Studies University. He is currently the International Relations editor for Asian Studies Review.