On behalf of the Local Organising Committee and the Scientific Program committee, we are pleased to announce the draft program for SHARP 2018 in Sydney, Australia. From a thought-provoking opening at the magnificent State Library of New South Wales to inspiring keynotes by luminaries from around Australia and abroad, SHARP promises a unique and transformative journey through the history of the book. With a carefully peer-reviewed delegate program rigorously and thoughtfully led by the Local Organising Committee and the Program Scientific Committee, SHARP 2018 will contribute to diversifying and expanding our field, plugging into the deep primal reasons of why we share stories and why the history of books — in all their varied and diversified forms — matters. Join us, 9-12 July 2018, at SHARP 2018.

Saturday 7 July 2018
2:00pm-3:00pm Special Talk: Ian Gadd State Library of New South Wales, Gallery Room
The Forgotten History of the Dog Ear

Professor Ian Gadd (Bath Spa University) will trace the history of folding the corner of a page and the dog-earing practices in England, from the 16th century onwards, revealing a hitherto unexplored area of readerly engagement. He will argue that, rather than being dismissed as a symbol of misuse, the dog-ear ought to be understood as an emblem of active, meaningful use. Marginalia and manicules have had their histories told; the dog-ear should have its day.

Sunday 8 July 2018
10:30am-4:30pm Meeting
* SHARP Publications
PCC.9.10, WSU Parramatta City Campus (1PSQ)
Monday 9 July 2018
9:30am-1:00pm SHARP pre-conference symposium: Chinese digital publishing and reading: Evolving models and emergent cultural practices EA.G.19 (LT03), WSU Parramatta South (P-S) Campus
9:30am-12:00pm SHARP Executive Committee Meeting EA.1.04, WSU P-S Campus
12:00m-1:00pm SHARP Executive Committee Meeting (Lunch) EA.1.04, WSU P-S Campus
1:00pm-3:00pm SHARP Executive Committee Meeting EA.1.04, WSU P-S Campus
1:00pm-4:00pm University of Technology Sydney
Library Retrieval System Tours
University of Technology Sydney Library
Ultimo Rd & Quay St, Haymarket NSW 2000
3:30pm-5:00pm State Library of New South Wales
Library Tours
State Library of New South Wales (meet in Mitchell Wing foyer on the Tasman Map)
5:30pm-6:00pm Pre-Opening Reception
* Book Launch: Paul Eggert
State Library of New South Wales, Gallery Room
6:00pm-8:00pm Opening Reception
* Welcome to Country: Uncle Chicka Madden
* State Librarian: John Vallance
* Western Sydney University Librarian: Lisa Tyson
* Keynote: Elizabeth Webby
* Chair: Sydney Shep
State Library of New South Wales, Gallery Room
From First to Last Texts: Adventures in Australian Book History

My talk highlights some of the changes in our understanding of and research into Australian literary and book history during the past fifty years. It presents a brief and personal history of my involvement with some first and last Australia texts, with texts understood in the widest possible sense. I begin with a few images of Australia’s very first texts, taken during post-retirement travels to remote areas of Western Australia and the Northern Territory. These were carved into or painted onto rocks by our First Peoples, who have lived here for at least 60,000 years, creating what is now acknowledged to be the oldest continuous culture in the world. I then discuss the reading, writing and publishing of texts in Sydney during the first fifty years of European colonization, before moving on to last texts, those produced during the digital revolution of the past twenty-five years. These have transformed research into Australian literary and book history in ways I could never have imagined back in the 1960s when I began my own research in the area.

Tuesday 10 July 2018
8:00am Conference registration EE Auditorium Foyer, WSU Parramatta South Campus
9:00am-9:30am Conference Opening
* Welcome to Country
* Western Sydney University Representative
* President, SHARP
* Co-Conveners (Housekeeping)
EE Auditorium, WSU Parramatta South Campus
9:30am-10:30am Featured Speaker
* Keynote: Richard Nile
* Chair: Jason Ensor
EE Auditorium, WSU Parramatta South Campus
Censorship and the Implicated Reader

From the very moment of its strange origins as a place of exile and incarceration, settler Australia possessed higher literacy levels than in Britain. Compulsory education from the mid-nineteenth century ensured that virtually all setters could read and write by the time of Federation in 1901. Putting to good effect these skills, Australians purchased, borrowed and otherwise shared a greater number of books per head of population than any country in the English speaking world. In short, the Australians constituted a nation of readers. Yet, not all readers were equal before the law. As national regulations governing the circulation of books became more restrictive in the four decades to 1969, censors expressed their reservations about who might be reading what. They deemed that male readers of low social standing or weak intellect should be quarantined from reading matter that might excite their passions or politics, while chivalry demanded that women readers be protected against anything that might compromise or threaten feminine modesty and delicacy. In this presentation, I examine print culture, the censor and the implicated reader in Australia before making a few concluding observations about contemporary reading, moral panics and the web in the twenty first century.

10:30am-11:00am Refreshment break (catered) EE.G.36 Wing Room, WSU Parramatta South Campus
11:00am-12:30pm Parallel Session 1 EA Building, WSU Parramatta South Campus
12:30pm-2:00pm Lunch (catered) EE.G.36 Wing Room, WSU Parramatta South Campus
1:00pm-1:30pm Book Launch
* Helen Bones
* Victoria Kuttainen, Susann Liebich, Sarah Galletly
EE.G.02 Wing Room, WSU Parramatta South Campus
1:00pm-1:45pm Meeting
* SHARP Regional Liaisons
EA.1.02, WSU Parramatta South Campus
2:00pm-3:30pm Parallel Session 2 EA Building, WSU Parramatta South Campus
3:30pm-4:00pm Refreshment break (catered) EE.G.36 Wing Room, WSU Parramatta South Campus
4:00pm-5:00pm Featured Speaker
* Keynote: Katherine Bode
* Chair: Helen Bones
EE Auditorium, WSU Parramatta South Campus
Communications circuits and interdisciplinary “riots” in the digital (humanities) age

In the interminable story where the humanities feature as damsel in distress, in the past decade digital humanities have often been cast in a starring role: as saviour or villain. Book history offers an ideal site from which to retell this story about the increasing intersection of humanities questions, artefacts, and arguments with digital technologies, resources and methods: as one chapter in an extended, transformative interdisciplinary conversation. Essential to this new story is the understanding that digital humanities resources and methods are reshaped and transformed by the intersection with book history at least as much as the insights and activities of book history are altered by that connection. I will make this case with reference to a project to discover and investigate fiction in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Australian newspapers, which demonstrates the capacity of digital collections and modelling methods to transform existing understandings of this topic. But at the same time, it shows how those resources and methods are meaningfully reshaped by the nature of the documentary and historical evidence investigated, and by the collaborative connections that investigation generates, within and beyond academe.

5:30pm-7:00pm Book Launch and Digital Showcase
Drinks and Canapés
Sponsored by the Digital Humanities Research Group, and the School of Humanities and Communication Arts
* Professor Simon Burrows
* Professor Hart Cohen
EZ.G.22–23 & 36 (CONF), WSU Parramatta South Campus
7:30pm-10:00pm Young Scholars’ Drinks and Dinner The Albion
135 George St, Parramatta
Wednesday 11 July 2018
8:00am Conference registration EE Auditorium foyer, WSU Parramatta South Campus
9:00am-10:30am Parallel Session 3 EA Building, WSU Parramatta South Campus
10:30am-11:00am Refreshment break (catered) EA Building, WSU Parramatta South Campus
11:00am-12:30pm Parallel Session 4 EA Building, WSU Parramatta South Campus
12:30pm-2:00pm Lunch (catered) EE.G.36 Wing Room, WSU P-S Campus
1:00pm-1:30pm Book Launch by Claire Squires
* Millicent Weber
EE.G.02 Wing Room, WSU Parramatta South Campus
2:00pm-3:30pm Parallel Session 5 EA Building, WSU Parramatta South Campus
3:30pm-4:00pm Refreshment break (catered) EA Building, WSU Parramatta South Campus
4:00pm-5:00pm Featured Speaker
* Keynote: Zhiqiang Zhang
* Chair: Xiang Ren
EE Auditorium, WSU Parramatta South Campus
Culture identity, Western influence, and the changes in characters layout in Chinese books

Chinese characters are arranged vertically and columns are progressed from right to left in traditional Chinese books. This is very different from the arrangement of text in Western books. From the beginning of the Chinese books to the early of 20th century, most of the Chinese books were always arranged the characters in vertical order because of the Chinese culture identity. At the end of the l9th century, after Western printing technology entered China, Chinese people, who begun to use the modern printing technology, still arranged characters vertically in Chinese books because of this tradition. However, with the growth of cultural communication between the West and China in late imperial China, especially with successive waves of Western literature, science and technology entering China, the vertical arrangement of Chinese characters was destabilized by the horizontal arrangement of Western letters and numerals in works involving calculations and formulas. There were many debates about the changes of the layout of Chinese characters in the period of Republic of China (1912-1949). After 1949, character layout in Mainland China was changed to the horizontal order because of the state power. Now, the layout of characters in most of Chinese books is similar to western books. Cultural communication between the West and China has played a great role in that change.

7:30pm-10:00pm Conference Dinner Sahra by the River Restaurant
2/76 Phillip St, Parramatta
Thursday 12 July 2018
8:00am Conference registration EE Auditorium foyer, WSU P-S Campus
9:00am-9:30am SHARP 25th Anniversary EE Auditorium, WSU P-S Campus
9:30am-10:30am Featured Speaker
* Keynote: David Carter
* Chair: Simone Murray
EE Auditorium, WSU Parramatta South Campus
“Australia at last seems to have become articulate”*: Australian books and authors in the American marketplace

The history of Australian books and authors in the USA has received little attention in literary scholarship or the history of the book. While the dominance of the Australian book trade by the British publishing industry is fundamental to the history of Australian books and publishing, to focus only on London and the imperial connection is to ignore the other great centres of Anglophone publishing in the 19th and 20th centuries—New York, and then Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago. Although in the majority of cases Australian works had to travel to London or originate there if they were to find themselves in book form at all, London was not just an end-point; it could also act as a relay station, giving books the power to travel further, to the United States above all. Australian books and authors were persistent and occasionally prominent participants in the flourishing transatlantic book trade, resulting in a much longer and denser history of Australian presence in American book culture than has previously been recognised. Australian Books and Authors in the American Marketplace (1840s-1940s), co-authored with Dr Roger Osborne, is the first comprehensive study of this history over the century to the end of the 1940s, a complex story of commerce, culture and copyright. Although the much-anticipated post-war boom in American interest in Australia (and Australian books) never arrived, we do reveal earlier “booms” in the presence of Australian books and authors in the US, in the late-19th century and the inter-war years, such that American readers and reviewers began to take notice—as the quotation in my title suggests. The present paper will reflect on the processes of researching this large-scale project, present some of its key findings, and examine the way these help to reconfigure our sense of national, transnational and imperial histories of the book. (* The Bookman, April-May 1930.)

10:30am-11:00am Refreshment break (catered) EE.G.36 Wing Room, WSU Parramatta South Campus
11:00am-12:30pm Parallel Session 6 EA Building, WSU Parramatta South Campus
12:30pm-2:00pm Lunch (catered) EE.G.36 Wing Room, WSU Parramatta South Campus
1:00pm-1:30pm Book Launch by Professor Paul Eggert
* David Carter
* Roger Osborne
EE.G.02 Wing Room, WSU Parramatta South Campus
1:00pm-1:30pm Female Orphan School Heritage Tour (pax 10) Female Orphan School, WSU Parramatta South Campus
2:00pm-3:30pm Parallel Session 7 EA Building, WSU Parramatta South Campus
3:30pm-4:00pm Refreshment break (catered) EE.G.36 Wing Room, WSU Parramatta South Campus
4:00pm-5:00pm SHARP AGM EE Auditorium, WSU Parramatta South Campus
Friday 13 July 2018
All Day Self-booked excursions Around Sydney
http://sharp2018.sydney/travel/around-sydney/Things to Do in Sydney
http://sharp2018.sydney/family-activities/things-to-do-in-sydney/

Things to Do in Parramatta
http://sharp2018.sydney/family-activities/things-to-do-in-parramatta/

Family Activities
http://sharp2018.sydney/family-activities/